August 10, 2022

SMART goals are a popular goal-setting framework many successful organizations use when setting goals for the company. You have probably heard the term before but may have been confused about how it works.

This article will break down each facet of a SMART goal with examples for each step.

Continue reading the article below to learn more and see some SMART goals examples in practice.

What are SMART Goals With Examples

●     Specific

When setting goals for your organization that can be achieved, i.e., SMART goals, the first thing you must do is choose plans that are specific. The goal needs to have clear answers to common questions such as; What must be accomplished? Who’s in charge of making sure it is complete? What is the course of action needed to achieve the goal?

If you can not answer the questions when coming up with a goal, the objective isn’t a SMART goal.

Example: Increase website traffic by building a customer review system

●     Measurable

Goals can’t just be specific; they need to be measurable to keep track of you and your organization’s progress in achieving your goals and give you a finish line for you to reach for.

Looking at the example above, you have a specific goal to increase website traffic by building a customer review system. But how much do you want to increase the traffic? How robust is the customer review system going to be? These questions need to be answered when making SMART goals.

Example: Increase website traffic by 200 percent by building a customer review system that allows for customer-submitted videos and other content.

●     Achievable

Just because a goal can be measurable doesn’t mean it’s a well-planned goal. It also has to be achievable; otherwise, you are setting a finish line you and your team can never reach. This will only lead to employee satisfaction. It requires an evaluation of the market and history to see if your goals are achievable in the current market.

Looking at the measurable example is increasing your website by 200 percent achievable in a current time frame. After looking at your competitors and your existing market share, you may be planning to attract customers that don’t exist.

Example: Increase website traffic by 60 percent with a customer review system that allows for customer-submitted content.

●     Relevant

It is here where you ask why you’re creating this goal. What is the value of creating a customer review system? How will it increase traffic and improve customer engagement? If you can’t offer a reasonable explanation for your reasoning, it is time to start over.

Example:  Increase website traffic by 60 percent with a customer review system that allows for customer-submitted content. User-submitted content encourages repeat visitors and fosters an environment of open communication.

●     Time-Bound

This step involves creating a timeline for when your goals need to be accomplished. This step comes last since in order to create a reasonable timeline, your goal needs to be specific, measurable, and achievable. The only way to accomplish this step is if you have followed the previous steps correctly.

Example: Increase website traffic by 60 percent with a customer review system that allows for customer-submitted content. User-submitted content encourages repeat visitors and fosters an environment of open communication. It must be accomplished by the end of the year.

SMART Goals Can Help Your Business Reach New Heights

You should now have a well-rounded understanding of constructing a SMART goal. As you can see, each step helps create a goal that can benefit your organization and your employees.

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